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April 27, Staff Writers. With all the things you have going on as a student, writing a paper can seem like a daunting task. This image and list-based, step-by-step best dissertation service is the closest thing to writing a plug and chug paper you can get. So, are you ready to ace this paper of yours? The answer to this question is easy: look at the materials the prof gives you. The first important step in writing a paper is taking some time to understand what the professor is looking for. If you know that, you can write to the rubric and pick up easy points along the way.

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Essay college scholarships

I was required to first take a test over HOSA rules, regulations, and guidelines. I was then asked to set goals for the organization and give a speech regarding my goal ideas in front of several hundred people, the current state delegates and officer team. The final step was a vote by the current state delegates and officer team. Over 2, students came together to learn from five outstanding healthcare professionals.

Topics included exploring healthcare careers, changes in healthcare, and medical innovations needed in the industry. I had the opportunity to have an active role in facilitating and participating in workshops and meetings for HOSA members. The goal of these workshops and meetings was to develop practical leadership skills, effective communication skills with people of all ages, and to understand the importance of encouraging individual and group achievements.

Exceptional qualities that I plan on using in my career. In September I participated in the HOSA Washington Leadership Conference where officers from all the states learned strategies to improve our leadership skills. These interactive workshops included topics on self-motivation, problem-solving skills, managing others, and professionalism. We explored and presented evidence regarding the importance of funding for these types of educational opportunities. Upon completion of this conference I reported back to the local Board of Education sharing my experiences and the success of our meetings.

Both of these conferences taught me what it takes to be successful in healthcare. As my tenure was coming to a close, I organized meetings with the local students who were planning to run for local and state officer positions. I met with them in groups and individually to help prepare them for the interview process, and to emphasize the importance of maintaining the high standard of leadership in the global health community, if elected. I had an integral role in interviewing, selecting, and presenting the new Ohio State Officers to over students and advisors from around the state.

In conclusion, my HOSA experience helped provide me with improvements in leadership, communication, and team work skills. As I move onto college each of these skills will help me in defining my goals, establishing lasting friendships and relationships, and working with others for common goals for the betterment of our local, state, and national health communities. I am confident that all of these qualities that I have learned and practiced through HOSA will contribute to my success in every aspect of my future!

My doctor told my parents that I would need Spinal Fusion Surgery with rods and screws, and it had to happen quickly. I immediately went to the local gym and began working with a personal trainer, Justin. I learned so much from him including how the body works and how surgery takes time to heal. After surgery, I knew that I wanted to use my experience to help others, just like Justin helped me. My ultimate goal is to own my own gym to help others, just like Justin helped me. I will also include a nutritional supplement line to make sure clients are fit inside and out.

I know I will successfully reach my goals! These areas of study will give me the knowledge and background to achieve my ultimate goal. In association with this area of study, I will also be taking an entrepreneurial class and participating in entrepreneurial study group. This will help me in understanding the energy, perseverance, financial commitment, and planning needed to open my own business. Upon graduation in 4 years, I plan on getting a job in a field associated with my goals, continuing to learn about the field, investing and saving to achieve my dream of having my own gym.

A feeling of contentment washes over me as I slip out of bed and into my slippers. I love my laid back mornings. No alarms are jolting me out of a deep sleep followed by a mad rush to get ready and catch a bus like the other children in the neighborhood. From the time I entered kindergarten until my eighth-grade year, I had the privilege of being homeschooled. It was during these formative years that I developed a love of reading and learning. My siblings and I used a literature-based curriculum which made history and other subjects come alive.

My favorite part of the school day was our read-aloud books. My mom would sit on the couch, and the four of us would gather around her to see the pictures and hear the stories and then discuss the adventures we just went on. It was so enjoyable that it hardly seemed like school and we would beg for more. The schooled kids I would talk with were all jealous and wished they could be taught at home, too. I had plenty of opportunities to be a child and learn through play during the early years and to explore and follow my interests, which often centered around horses and animals.

The freedom to pursue my interests is how my passion for architectural design also began as I got a little older. In the early years, my mom would dictate for me and allow me to answer questions orally while my written expression and spelling developed.

This method worked well for me. I learned much later that I had dyslexia, and I believe if I had started off in public school I would have been frustrated and realized I was struggling more than the other children. My love for learning very well may have been hampered.

The joy of reading and learning is just the tip of the iceberg of how I benefited from being taught at home. I got to grow up surrounded by my family, interacting with them, working as a team, and calling my siblings my best friends. I developed valuable life skills as a result of doing life together. I learned to cook, do laundry, watch younger siblings, plant a garden, clean, and I learned a lot about good health. I learned responsibility, time management, and how to work independently.

I became self-motivated and took an interest in my learning. Homeschooling laid a firm foundation; my values are firmly rooted. My work ethics are strong. I can stand on my own two feet and function independently. I have the skills to manage both my education and my personal life outside of my home. I have the skills necessary to be a successful college student and to pursue a higher level of learning. I give much of this credit to the experience I received as a homeschooled student early on in my formative years.

My degree will provide me with the skills, tools, and technology necessary to digitally design. Communication and interpersonal skills will also be part of my educational foundation as interaction with clients will be an essential part of my job. There are several avenues I could pursue with my degree, but my passion lies in residential architectural design. I will be working in a position where I will be talking to clients, drawing out their dreams in a house, designing it, watching it come to life before my eyes, and seeing them move in, making that space their own.

As I gain knowledge and expertise, I envision myself volunteering for an organization like Habitats for Humanity which provide housing for those in need of a place to call home. The battlefield was a scrap-littered felt carpet, white fold-up chairs graffitied by permanent marker and frozen yogurt bowls full of worn-down pencils. I was the lone volunteer, deploying only two open ears as a weapon, and had to coax their participation in the annual Christmas craft bonanza that they dreaded for weeks.

My first and most impactful lesson in teaching had begun. The class quickly degenerated into anarchy. I spent the first twenty minutes watching as elbows sent pencils overboard and handmade tattoos crawled up arms. With chaos mounting, I was paralyzed by the inability to speak. I forced myself to listen, as their conversations progressed to artistic ideas: Spiderman ornaments, Batman Christmas cards, ninja star origami.

I expected a stir of artistic energy as their art took shape, but all I heard was the crinkling of paper and scattering of markers as ideas never became reality. Then, it clicked. I could fulfill my duty as a teacher by cultivating the artistic visions I heard. Rather, I could listen, and use my observation to empower their artistic expression.

Slowly, I worked to tailor to each fantasy-infused idea, with Pinterest, bubble cuts, and mounds of tape to aid me. As class ended with an assortment of festive superhero projects, I saw a glimpse of the impact that I could make by responding to my observations.

Now, I cherish the chance to act based on what I hear. Listening is a skill that I feel is often under appreciated in leadership. People usually flock to the figure in the center of the room, not the person on the side listening. While in college, I hope to impact my own learning experience and that of the student body around me by taking an active listening approach. Rather than sink back to my high school mindset that purely focused on soaking in knowledge and regurgitating it for grades, I plan to adopt a posture of employing my listening abilities to curate and act upon a stronger understanding of the lives and perspectives of my campus.

Whether it be reciprocating the advice I receive in my summer transition program to my future roommates or finding campus opportunities best fit for my classmates while in conversation with upperclassmen, I believe that I will be able to positively impact both my own individual growth and the intellectual development of others by harnessing my observations and parlaying them into new opportunities, connections, and insights for others. At a large school, I will be able to work alongside a student body with a swath of complex and fresh career plans, and it is through my observations and subsequent response that I hope to help others move further along their path to reaching their ideals while pursuing my own career in medicine.

In doing so, I am confident that I will be able to forge the deep, lasting bonds that I consider critical for personal development all while building up skills in observation and interaction- traits that I consider integral to a successful medicinal career.

Based on my experience working and bonding with youth, I want to be able to integrate psychological concepts into my future work as a pediatrician to develop supportive and insightful relationships with my patients. As a psychobiology major, I hope to continue building a strong, fundamental understanding of the mental aspects of human well-being to complement with a growing knowledge of the physical aspects involved in bodily development. While learning, I plan to integrate and enhance an expanding grasp of psychological concepts within my volunteer and extracurricular activities, as I find new organizations and clubs that allow me to teach children and gain further insight into how psychological ideas can impact the health of a child.

Following this experience, I plan to attend medical school, where I will be able to harness my undergraduate education to explore medical concepts in depth while also receiving more hands-on experience shadowing and observing the work of current and future physicians.

Ultimately, I plan to discover a career path that fits both my strong interest in the underlying mental and physical factors that shape child development and translate my knowledge into becoming a dependable and caring pediatrician. Essay Prompt: Submit an essay , words on the following topic:. Each scholarship provider is looking for students who meet certain criteria. Genuine passion and enthusiasm for your topic will show through in your essay writing. Make sure to follow all of the necessary steps and review them before submitting your scholarship essay.

Trust us, some of the brightest students have missed out on the chance to earn scholarships dollars all because they neglected to follow instructions. Scholarship committees would rather see how you overcame hardships and succeeded despite the obstacles in your path or what you learned from the times you failed. Share something about who you are. Telling your story makes an essay genuine and ultimately more memorable to the scholarship committee. Asking teachers, counselors, family members, or trustworthy friends for feedback on your essay will result in a better final product.

Scholarship committees do notice grammar mistakes. Eveny tiny errors can distract a reader from your overall message. Before you submit your application make sure you take the time to proofread your essay from beginning to end. Our online essay writing tutors are here for you anytime you get discouraged.

We can help with everything from brainstorming and outlining to revising the final draft. Get one-on-one help from former Ivy League and top tier admission officers. Our College Admission Counselors will help you find, apply, and get accepted to your dream school.

Learn More. Connect with our featured colleges to find schools that both match your interests and are looking for students like you. Teach or Tutor for Us. College Readiness. All Rights Reserved. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University.

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The very first step is to get some organic ideas circulating so that you end up choosing an essay focus that makes the most sense for you. Here are some awesome essay brainstorming techniques. Some students like to skip the outline, but it actually makes the drafting process much faster!

We like these resources for how to create a basic essay outline and how to work through the outlining process. Uh, what-os? Ethos, pathos, and logos are modes of persuading your reader, in other words, techniques to make your work more powerful and convincing. For example, you might discuss how your experience working a part-time job has influenced your thoughts on minimum wage laws.

For example, you might paint a picture of all of the wildlife lost in massive brush fires. For example, you may use statistics to convey how reliant modern society is on their cell phones. Your life and experiences are interesting and important! You do not need to embellish or make up details to try to seem more deserving of the scholarship money.

Nothing is more powerful than your authenticity. Hmmm…have you really tutored thousands of students? We get it. Trust us—your unexaggerated accomplishments are impressive! This is the cardinal rule for writing. Try to paint a vivid picture for your reader instead of just explaining everything.

Illustrate what that stress looks like in your life. Ar you pulling all-nighters and pounding coffee? Doing homework on your breaks at work? Create a picture, and provide specific, believable examples. In searing pain, I laid on the ice as the crowd fell silent.

Something was very wrong. Notice how we immediately FEEL the impact of the injury in the later example! While we encourage you to be evocative in your language, we also want to stress that you should get to the point. Typically, the simplest, most direct word choices and images are the most effective. Avoid generalizations in favor of specific examples, and likewise, avoid ornate, flowery language in favor of more succinct sentences.

This sentiment feels overly general and wordy:. This rewrite expresses the same idea in a much more succinct and specific way:. We all know that exclamation marks indicate excitement! Truthfully, we love exclamation points! And while winning scholarship money to pay for college IS very exciting, too many exclamation marks can be overkill.

In this case, you can use exclamation marks more freely. Many people falsely believe that an exclamation mark will make a sentence more powerful. But the truth is, empowering statements pack a punch without one.

Essay readers are not simply looking for the hardest story when selecting a winner, but rather a complete narrative that includes how the student has worked to overcome the challenge. In addition, we recommend focusing on a central event or experience — which tends to read as more powerful, especially when faced with a word or character limit.

So long as you keep it professional, readers want you to sound like YOU. Keep it clean and clear, but also keep it real! Is this the definition of a humble brag? Your character, dedication, and integrity should come through naturally in your writing.

Most scholarship essays are fairly short, so avoid bloating your essay with gratitude and praise for the opportunity. Use your character and words allotments to answer the prompt thoroughly instead! Polite but to the point. So revise, revise, revise! Walk away from your work to clear your mind and then come back to it. Choose a trusted teacher, peer, or friend, and be open to their suggestions for improvement.

Make sure it is absolutely spic and span. Spelling errors, grammar mistakes, and typos are the fastest way to have your scholarship essay dismissed by the readers! On the other hand, having a pristine essay substantially increases your chances of being selected. Need your work instantly proofed and improved?

We sure do. Whether you find them scrolling Instagram or keep them tacked up above your desk, a great quote can be super empowering. I want to go to college so I can become a nurse and change the world. This essay is about you , so famous quotes are just a distraction. The name of the game for winning scholarships is standing out from the mix.

Platitudes are super common, overly simplified statements that people use all the time. DO illustrate specifically how things will change if you win the scholarship money. Many scholarship essay prompts ask you to discuss how winning a scholarship would impact you, and this is where cliches often creep in. Cliches are phrases, stories, or themes that are overused to the point that they lose their power and meaning.

Many cliches involve a person who, with a little help, turns it all around and prevails. In real life we LOVE a Cinderella story as much as anyone, but you can imagine why this type of story ends up in scholarship essays a lot! But when it comes to scholarship essays, we want to help you to avoid falling into cliche narratives that dampen the power of your story and hurt your chances of winning.

DO be realistic and specific when talking about yourself, your background, and your aspirations. Winning this scholarship money would help fund my semester overseas. But you may be surprised at how many people do! Will you actually offend anyone with that kind of conversational tone? Whether the challenge is naval defense or family finances or even just a flat tire on my bike before another night shift, I will be solving these problems and will always be looking to keep rolling on.

Success is triumphing over hardships -- willing yourself over anything and everything to achieve the best for yourself and your family. With this scholarship, I will use it to continue focusing on my studies in math and engineering, instead of worrying about making money and sending more back home. It will be an investment into myself for my family. Prompt: Explain something that made a big impact in your life.

I started skating as a ten-year-old in Spain, admiring how difficulty and grace intertwine to create beautiful programs, but no one imagined I would still be on the ice seven years and one country later. Even more unimaginable was the thought that ice skating might become one of the most useful parts of my life. I was born in Mexico to two Spanish speakers; thus, Spanish was my first language.

We then moved to Spain when I was six, before finally arriving in California around my thirteenth birthday. Each change introduced countless challenges, but the hardest part of moving to America, for me, was learning English. Laminated index cards, color-coded and full of vocabulary, became part of my daily life. As someone who loves to engage in a conversation, it was very hard to feel as if my tongue was cut off. Only at the ice rink could I be myself; the feeling of the cold rink breeze embracing me, the ripping sound of blades touching the ice, even the occasional ice burning my skin as I fell—these were my few constants.

From its good-natured bruise-counting competitions to its culture of hard work and perseverance, ice skating provided the nurturing environment that made my other challenges worthwhile. Knowing that each moment on the ice represented a financial sacrifice for my family, I cherished every second I got. Often this meant waking up every morning at 4 a.

It meant assisting in group lessons to earn extra skating time and taking my conditioning off-ice by joining my high school varsity running teams. Even as I began to make friends and lose my fear of speaking, the rink was my sanctuary. Eventually, however, the only way to keep improving was to pay for more coaching, which my family could not afford. And so I started tutoring Spanish. Now, the biggest passion of my life is supported by my most natural ability. I have had over thirty Spanish students, ranging in age from three to forty and spanning many ethnic backgrounds.

I currently work with fifteen students each week, each with different needs and ways of learning. When I first started learning my axel jump, my coach told me I would have to fall at least times about a year of falls! Likewise, I have my students embrace every detail of a mistake until they can begin to recognize new errors when they see them. I encourage them to expand their horizons and take pride in preparing them for new interactions and opportunities.

Although I agree that I will never live off of ice skating, the education and skills I have gained from it have opened countless doors. Ice skating has given me the resilience, work ethic, and inspiration to develop as a teacher and an English speaker. It has improved my academic performance by teaching me rhythm, health, and routine. It also reminds me that a passion does not have to produce money in order for it to hold immense value.

Ceramics, for instance, challenges me to experiment with the messy and unexpected. While painting reminds me to be adventurous and patient with my forms of self-expression. As a child of immigrant parents, I learned to take responsibilities for my family and myself at a very young age.

Although my parents spoke English, they constantly worked in order to financially support my little brother and I. Meanwhile, my grandparents barely knew English so I became their translator for medical appointments and in every single interaction with English speakers. Even until now, I still translate for them and I teach my grandparents conversational English. The more involved I became with my family, the more I knew what I wanted to be in the future.

Since I was five, my parents pushed me to value education because they were born in Vietnam and had limited education. Before creating these clubs, I created a vision for these clubs so I can organize my responsibilities better as a leader.

The more involved I became, the more I learned as a leader and as a person. As a leader, I carried the same behavior I portrayed towards my younger cousins and sibling. My family members stressed the importance of being a good influence; as I adapted this behavior, I utilized this in my leadership positions. I learned to become a good role model by teaching my younger family members proper manners and guiding them in their academics so that they can do well.

In school, I guide my peers in organizing team uniform designs and in networking with a nonprofit organization for service events. I always wanted to be a pediatrician since I was fourteen. My strong interest in the medical field allowed me to open up my shell in certain situations— when I became sociable to patients in the hospital as a volunteer, when I became friendly and approachable to children in my job at Kumon Math and Reading Center, and when I portrayed compassion and empathy towards my teammates in the badminton team.

This program opened my eye to numerous opportunities in different fields of medicine and in different approaches in working in the medicine industry. With this interest, I plan to also become a part of a medical facility management team. In the future, I hope to pursue my dream of becoming a doctor by attaining an MD, and to double major in Managerial Economics.

I intend to study at UC Davis as a Biological Sciences major, where I anticipate to become extremely involved with the student community. By developing a network with them, I hope to work in one of their facilities some day. Prompt: The Fund for Education Abroad is committed to diversifying education abroad by providing funding to students who are typically under-represented in study abroad. I was hurt. That it was the worst thing in the world if my brother-in-law were gay or effeminite.

At that moment, I wish I could have hugged Ethan. My growth as a person was exponential. Within two months, my world expanded to include polyamory. But not jealous when she cheated on me. It can be easier sometimes with one person, absolutely.

As someone who is both polyamorus and queer, I feel like parts of my family and large parts of my community marginalize me for being different because society has told them to. I want to change that. Since I will be studying for an entire year in Prague, I will have the opportunity to attend the annual Mezipatra, an international film festival in November that screens around a hundred top-ranking films on lesbian, bisexual, transsexual and queer themes.

When I came out to my sister-in-law, she told me that people who are really set in their ways are more likely to be tolerant to different kinds of people after having relationships with these people. If I can be an example to my family, I can be an example to my classmates. If I can get the opportunity to travel abroad, I can be an example to the world. Not just through my relationships, but through my art. Fade in: A college student wanting to study abroad tells his conservative parents the truth….

Prompt: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Recall the most cherished memory with your father figure. When a child is born, he or she is given a birth certificate, which provides information such as name, date and place of birth, but most importantly it provides the names of the parents of the child.

My father left when I was one year old and I will soon be turning 17; I did the math and found that for about days he has neglected me. He was able to sleep nights without knowing whether or not I was dead or alive. In those days I learned how to walk, talk, and I became a strong young man without the provider of my Y Chromosome because he is nothing more to me than that. In the past I believed that my father was necessary to rise but instead I found that false hope was an unnecessary accessory and now I refuse to let the fact that I am fatherless define the limits of the great things that I can accomplish.

I, however, have found that grit can come from anywhere. When I was in middle school I was overweight and many other boys would call me names, and even after going to administration several times nothing changed and for several years I kept myself at bay because if I had done anything in return I would be no better than those guys who bullied me.

I previously had this perception that somebody else would come to my rescue, that somebody else would provide the mental strength to combat the hardships that were sent my way. But as time passed I grew tired of waiting for help that was never going to come so I had to become my own hero. Since making that decision I have been liberated from the labels that previously confined me and I took back control of my own life. My ability to be self motivated has assisted me in becoming a leader in several of my extracurricular activities.

I also developed skills on the wrestling mat. On one occasion I wrestled the person who was ranked the 9th best wrestler in the state and although I did not win there was not a single second that I was afraid to fail because I knew I gave it my all. Similarly I have put the same effort into becoming a successful. Make most of the dash. I know the difficulty that latinos face in this day and age I can envision assisting other young latinos achieving their dreams. I believe the most valuable thing in this world is opportunity because sometimes all it takes for someone to be successful is a chance to do so.

Consequently I would like to be part of that chance that can foster the growth of future success. Prompt: Please explain a personal hardship or catastrophic life event that you have experienced. How did you manage to overcome this obstacle? What did you learn and how did you grow from it? Filling out this application, and my college applications, has forced me to face head on the realities that I've grown up in.

Looking back and describing my life I see all the ways in which I am disadvantaged due to my socioeconomic status. But I think it's important to note that I wasn't fully aware of any of it growing up. I knew that my parents couldn't buy me everything, but I also knew that they hardly ever said no. I was a very normal child, asking for chicken nuggets and looking at mom and dad any time I was scared or unsure of something.

As I've grown I've learned to fight my own monsters but I now also battle the ones that frighten my parents, the monsters of a world that they weren't born into. Monsters of doubt and disadvantage that try to keep them stuck in a cycle of poverty; thriving in a world that casts them to the side and a society that, with its current political climate, doesn't welcome them with the warmest hello.

He's been one of the millions of people who has been laid off in the last couple of decades and has had to start over multiple times. But each time he's re-built himself with more resilience. I've grown up living in section 8 housing because my parents often found themselves living paycheck to paycheck, not by choice, but by circumstance. They've endured bankruptcy over credit card debt, have never owned a home, or been given access to resources that allow them to save.

Every time we've readapted, we get struck by a new change. I currently live in Manchester Square, a ghost town, byproduct of the Los Angeles Airport expansion project. The 16 steps I have always known, soon to be demolished. My neighbors are empty lots, enclosed by fences.

My home is soon to become an accommodation to an airport, soon to be nonexistent. Knowing that my family has to relocate as I'm applying to college makes me feel a tad guilty, because of my lack of resources, I fear it will become a barrier into my transition to college.

My parents finances are not a secret, I know their struggles as I hear about them day after day. My parents now deal with the burden of relocating, no longer having subsidized housing and again, struck by yet another need to readjust and reassemble. Relocating a family of 5 in an area plagued by gentrification of stadiums and demolition is no simple task as rent prices are as high as mortgages.

It's odd they don't want me to stress or have it become my problem but I know it is, and I want to do whatever I can to help. My older sister is the first in my family to go to college. I was always the shyer one. She's taught me through her efforts that the only limits you have are the ones you place on yourself.

With my sister's example I have followed in the footsteps of never letting money become a reason why I can't or won't do something. If my sister can do it, I can do it. I see the leadership characteristic is genetic and it runs in my entire family. I witness my parents be leaders everyday as they tackle cultural obstacles in a country that wasn't the one they were born into, speaking a language that is not their own, and raising children to succeed in a system of higher education; one they never had the privilege to be part of.

My family and I are one. We stack our efforts, and obstacles on top of each other to further our successes as a whole. When I think back to my family's story I'm amazed to think that my grandpa came to the US in the midst of WW2, a bracero, leaving his family to help feed millions of Americans in time of war. My grandpa, a man of the fields, paved the way so I could defy the odds with my prosperity.

At home, the teacher role often switches within my family. I am responsible for translating documents to my parents and explaining procedures and concepts as I, myself, am learning them. I have had the responsibility of helping assist my younger sister who has a mild case of Cerebral Palsy. Due to her pre-existing condition, she is a slow learner. I have dedicated a lot of time this past year, helping her with her transition from elementary to middle school and helping her adapt to such a drastic change.

Sometimes, I only sleep 4 hours as I wake up and rush out the door in order to make it on time to 6am tutoring. Having to manage my schoolwork and home responsibilities has been difficult but I've managed to maintain high academic achievement by managing my time correctly and being persistent. If I truly want something, I need to go after it, and I will get it done.

Sometimes being tired isn't an option. Describe a change you would like to make in the world. Tell us about how you would plan to make that change, and what obstacles you might encounter along the way. Nothing is more important to me than ending racial inequality and discrimination in America, as I do not want my younger siblings to face the discrimination Black people continue to face in our present society.

After winning our fight to freedom and provoking the passage of the Civil Rights Act, why do Black teens face higher poverty rates than Whites and are still four times more likely to be incarcerated? I know that social media can only do so much in addressing these issues as not everyone can afford the luxury of having internet access.

However, I hope that my campaign can inspire all those who do have access to take it upon themselves to be the change by being inspired by the fact that we are globally united in this issue. To make decisions. To show who you are. Tell us three things that are important to you. How did you arrive at this list? Will these things be important to you in ten years?

The three things that are important to me are my family, being successful, and leaving a legacy. As a result of my past, I keep these three crucial things at the forefront of my mind every day to help myself be successful. Above all, my family is the most important thing in my life. The meaning of family may differ for everyone, but for me, my family is life. I almost died in the Haitian earthquake, as Jacmel was one of the worst damaged areas, had it not been for my grandmother and my mom.

Later, if it was not for my uncle, my mom would not have been able to come to America to give me a better life. I am forever indebted to their sacrifices, and I am so grateful that I have their eternal love and support. Success is also very important to me. I hope to accomplish many things in my life, but most importantly, I would like to make my family proud so that they know that all of their sacrifices were worth it.

Success to me is having a career that I love and allows me to help my family members financially. I hope to no longer experience hardships such as homelessness, poverty, and economic difficulties, as I had in my young life. I do not wish to be glorified, but I want to be more than a nonentity in this big, vast world. I hope that if I can inspire the change that I want to make, I can leave a legacy that continues to influence and shape the landscape that follows me.

After coming to the epiphany that if I died today, nothing would change except for the lives of those extremely close to me, I find myself unwilling to be just another Jane Doe. I want to leave a part of myself behind, whether it is a building or a popular hashtag, that is meaningful and permanent once I die. What does it mean to you to be part of a minority community? What challenges has it brought and how have you overcome them?

What are the benefits? Being part of a minority is very conflicting for me as I feel both empowered as a part of a Haitian minority community but also disconnected from my non-immigrant peers. Coming from a background of poverty in Haiti, I knew that, even at a very young age, I had to be a good student in order to succeed.

This work ethic--found throughout my Haitian community--has been very beneficial in my life as we all came here to pave ourselves a better future. As my mom held two jobs, went to college, and was temporarily homeless just to secure me a better future, I feel invigorated to be part of such an indefatigable community. I was the only immigrant in a class of forty, barely spoke English, and had no friends because of these limitations.

Every day of those first few years, I felt an almost physical divide between my peers and myself. I never experienced a sense of belonging, despite my efforts.

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What did you learn and how did you grow from it? Filling out this application, and my college applications, has forced me to face head on the realities that I've grown up in. Looking back and describing my life I see all the ways in which I am disadvantaged due to my socioeconomic status. But I think it's important to note that I wasn't fully aware of any of it growing up. I knew that my parents couldn't buy me everything, but I also knew that they hardly ever said no.

I was a very normal child, asking for chicken nuggets and looking at mom and dad any time I was scared or unsure of something. As I've grown I've learned to fight my own monsters but I now also battle the ones that frighten my parents, the monsters of a world that they weren't born into. Monsters of doubt and disadvantage that try to keep them stuck in a cycle of poverty; thriving in a world that casts them to the side and a society that, with its current political climate, doesn't welcome them with the warmest hello.

He's been one of the millions of people who has been laid off in the last couple of decades and has had to start over multiple times. But each time he's re-built himself with more resilience. I've grown up living in section 8 housing because my parents often found themselves living paycheck to paycheck, not by choice, but by circumstance. They've endured bankruptcy over credit card debt, have never owned a home, or been given access to resources that allow them to save.

Every time we've readapted, we get struck by a new change. I currently live in Manchester Square, a ghost town, byproduct of the Los Angeles Airport expansion project. The 16 steps I have always known, soon to be demolished. My neighbors are empty lots, enclosed by fences. My home is soon to become an accommodation to an airport, soon to be nonexistent.

Knowing that my family has to relocate as I'm applying to college makes me feel a tad guilty, because of my lack of resources, I fear it will become a barrier into my transition to college. My parents finances are not a secret, I know their struggles as I hear about them day after day. My parents now deal with the burden of relocating, no longer having subsidized housing and again, struck by yet another need to readjust and reassemble. Relocating a family of 5 in an area plagued by gentrification of stadiums and demolition is no simple task as rent prices are as high as mortgages.

It's odd they don't want me to stress or have it become my problem but I know it is, and I want to do whatever I can to help. My older sister is the first in my family to go to college. I was always the shyer one.

She's taught me through her efforts that the only limits you have are the ones you place on yourself. With my sister's example I have followed in the footsteps of never letting money become a reason why I can't or won't do something. If my sister can do it, I can do it. I see the leadership characteristic is genetic and it runs in my entire family. I witness my parents be leaders everyday as they tackle cultural obstacles in a country that wasn't the one they were born into, speaking a language that is not their own, and raising children to succeed in a system of higher education; one they never had the privilege to be part of.

My family and I are one. We stack our efforts, and obstacles on top of each other to further our successes as a whole. When I think back to my family's story I'm amazed to think that my grandpa came to the US in the midst of WW2, a bracero, leaving his family to help feed millions of Americans in time of war. My grandpa, a man of the fields, paved the way so I could defy the odds with my prosperity. At home, the teacher role often switches within my family. I am responsible for translating documents to my parents and explaining procedures and concepts as I, myself, am learning them.

I have had the responsibility of helping assist my younger sister who has a mild case of Cerebral Palsy. Due to her pre-existing condition, she is a slow learner. I have dedicated a lot of time this past year, helping her with her transition from elementary to middle school and helping her adapt to such a drastic change. Sometimes, I only sleep 4 hours as I wake up and rush out the door in order to make it on time to 6am tutoring.

Having to manage my schoolwork and home responsibilities has been difficult but I've managed to maintain high academic achievement by managing my time correctly and being persistent. If I truly want something, I need to go after it, and I will get it done. Sometimes being tired isn't an option. Describe a change you would like to make in the world. Tell us about how you would plan to make that change, and what obstacles you might encounter along the way.

Nothing is more important to me than ending racial inequality and discrimination in America, as I do not want my younger siblings to face the discrimination Black people continue to face in our present society. After winning our fight to freedom and provoking the passage of the Civil Rights Act, why do Black teens face higher poverty rates than Whites and are still four times more likely to be incarcerated? I know that social media can only do so much in addressing these issues as not everyone can afford the luxury of having internet access.

However, I hope that my campaign can inspire all those who do have access to take it upon themselves to be the change by being inspired by the fact that we are globally united in this issue. To make decisions. To show who you are. Tell us three things that are important to you. How did you arrive at this list? Will these things be important to you in ten years? The three things that are important to me are my family, being successful, and leaving a legacy.

As a result of my past, I keep these three crucial things at the forefront of my mind every day to help myself be successful. Above all, my family is the most important thing in my life. The meaning of family may differ for everyone, but for me, my family is life. I almost died in the Haitian earthquake, as Jacmel was one of the worst damaged areas, had it not been for my grandmother and my mom. Later, if it was not for my uncle, my mom would not have been able to come to America to give me a better life.

I am forever indebted to their sacrifices, and I am so grateful that I have their eternal love and support. Success is also very important to me. I hope to accomplish many things in my life, but most importantly, I would like to make my family proud so that they know that all of their sacrifices were worth it. Success to me is having a career that I love and allows me to help my family members financially.

I hope to no longer experience hardships such as homelessness, poverty, and economic difficulties, as I had in my young life. I do not wish to be glorified, but I want to be more than a nonentity in this big, vast world. I hope that if I can inspire the change that I want to make, I can leave a legacy that continues to influence and shape the landscape that follows me.

After coming to the epiphany that if I died today, nothing would change except for the lives of those extremely close to me, I find myself unwilling to be just another Jane Doe. I want to leave a part of myself behind, whether it is a building or a popular hashtag, that is meaningful and permanent once I die.

What does it mean to you to be part of a minority community? What challenges has it brought and how have you overcome them? What are the benefits? Being part of a minority is very conflicting for me as I feel both empowered as a part of a Haitian minority community but also disconnected from my non-immigrant peers. Coming from a background of poverty in Haiti, I knew that, even at a very young age, I had to be a good student in order to succeed.

This work ethic--found throughout my Haitian community--has been very beneficial in my life as we all came here to pave ourselves a better future. As my mom held two jobs, went to college, and was temporarily homeless just to secure me a better future, I feel invigorated to be part of such an indefatigable community. I was the only immigrant in a class of forty, barely spoke English, and had no friends because of these limitations.

Every day of those first few years, I felt an almost physical divide between my peers and myself. I never experienced a sense of belonging, despite my efforts. Already a double minority as a woman and a Black person, I tried to relinquish my language and culture in favor of American language and values to better fit in the crowd. By doing this, however, I almost completely lost my cultural identity as both a Haitian and an immigrant, and also my language.

It was in the halls of my first high school, International Studies Charter High School, that I realized the enormity of what I had lost. Where my peers retained their cultural identities and language, I had almost lost mine. It was there, I learned to embrace a part of me that was virtually buried inside, as I was encouraged to be more open: speaking Creole with my Haitian math teacher and peers.

I am both a teacher and a student in that small classroom as I help them with their homework, and, in return, they help me in perfecting my use of Creole. They are my daily reminder of what unites us as Haitians—our ability to triumph in the face of adversity. Tell us about a time when you failed at something. What were the circumstances? How did you respond to failure? What lessons did you learn?

But, even after almost eight years, I could still barely extend my legs as high as my peers nor could do as many pirouettes as them. My flexibility was incredibly subpar and I easily wore out my Pointe shoes, making them unwearable after a couple of months. I was the weakling of my class at Ballet Etudes, and I was too absorbed in my insecurities to do anything to better myself to become the dancer I aspired to be. After a humiliating recital, wherein my pointe shoe ribbons untied in the middle of our group performance, I all but gave up on dance.

I was in the middle of doing a Changement de Pieds Change of feet jumping step when I glanced down in horror to see my beautiful ribbons untied as I forgot to tape them with clear tape as I usually did before my performances. Glancing to my right, I saw that my ballet teacher backstage had also taken note and was rushing me to get off the stage, her hands beckoning me in a frantic manner.

After berating me for not having properly tied my laces, I was not allowed to finish my part. But, because of my move to Port Saint Lucie in the summer before sophomore year, I was able to rekindle my passion for ballet and pointe at South Florida Dance Company. South Florida Dance Company was my saving grace, a place where I was able to restart my experiences in dance and renew the joy I once felt in my art. It was an incredible feeling regaining my confidence and surety in my abilities, as a result of the additional help that I received from my dance teacher, Ms.

Presently, I always remind myself to be the best that I can be and to positively use my dance role models, like Misty Copeland, as encouragement to be a better dancer. Prompt: Please explain how your experience volunteering and participating in community service has shaped your perspective on humanity. Elaborate on how these experiences have influenced your future ambitions and career choice.

It took a 3, mile flight for me to gain a different perspective of the world, of my world. When I landed in Maine it was nothing like the place I called home. There was no traffic, there were lots of trees, and absolutely no spanish to be heard anywhere. I missed my people, my home, and my community the most as I saw the ways in which other communities fostered creativity, advocacy, and community involvement. I talked about my community every chance I got, writing a public backlash to Donald Trump and reading out to the group of parents to show them my unique struggle.

The election of Donald Trump has forced me to come to terms with the harsh realities of this world. The lack of respect he has for women, minority groups, and factual evidence are alarming. This presidency makes me want to prove wrong all of his perceptions of people like me, the poor, the immigrant, the woman.

I left people in awe, leaving me empowered. I emphasized that I, like many others, am in between and we have the same platform that anyone else does to succeed. I explained that many of us, hold this pressure of first generation children of immigrants to prove that we are the proof that our parents sacrifices of restarting in a new country was worth it.

I was the visible representation of a first generation child of immigrants, branching out into a new environment despite where I had come from and shocking everyone with my prosperity. If I was the only visible representation available, I was going to use my voice to echo the feelings of my entire community and make it known that we are all here-- all of our struggles, our efforts, and our passions, are not absent from places where we are not seen.

Maine helped me branch out in my own community now as a Student Ambassador. I spend a lot of time interpreting for parents at meetings and explaining the current events that are ongoing and new educational opportunities that students should take advantage of.

I have had the privilege to work alongside office staff and the Principal, where I get to positively dedicate my time to parents who have general questions regarding the schools upcoming events. By dedicating my time as a Student Ambassador, I have allowed myself to excel at communicating with others and improving my customer service skills. I want my education to change the negative stigmas surrounding my community, by showing that it's possible to expand your access to the world and allow you to leave, by choice, through receiving a post-secondary education.

I am someone who has grown up in an area with limited resources fostering limited mindsets. My neighborhood has 4 elementary schools, 2 high schools, and a strip club feet away from a library. What message does that send to children? It's normal in my community to have pregnant classmates in high school. People aren't aware of the world outside, they aren't encouraged to ever leave. Through my experience as a volunteer that communicates a lot with parents, I have learned that the American Dream does not simply belong to first generation students like myself.

I have found that our accomplishments are stacked upon the sacrifices of our parents. I want to demonstrate to my community that there can be a female, bilingual, Latina doctor. I want to showcase that one's zip code, doesn't determines one's success. Concepts like financial aid, grants, loans, are all foreign concepts as most of our parents never went to college.

They want to be able to help but do not know where to begin. As a student ambassador I helped bridge that gap. We often held meetings where we explained to parents within our community what resources were out there and available and what the difference were among the different options for each student. Prompt: Discuss in your essay any challenges or obstacles you have dealt with and overcome in life and how this will help you succeed in college and beyond.

Describe how volunteer, community service or extra-curricular activities have shaped who you are today and what it has taught you. May also include future educational plans and career goals. I have encountered an emotional barrier making it difficult to manage my schoolwork, extracurricular activities and family responsibilities. I have had to deal with being viciously raped by a peer during my sophomore year, resulting in severe depression.

I just wanted someone to know how I felt and how much I needed help. It took a 3, mile flight for me to gain a different perspective of my world. Landing in Maine was nothing like home. There was no traffic, lots of trees, and absolutely no Spanish to be heard anywhere. I was a 10th grader when I found myself at Coastal Studies for Girls, a marine science and leadership school; I would be there for a whole semester. I was surrounded by strangers who looked different, sounded different, and could recite tide pool specifics in casual conversation.

I was the visible representation of a first-generation child of immigrants, branching out into a new environment. An environment where I wanted to prove wrong all perceptions of people like me, the poor, the immigrant, the brown woman.

I used my voice to echo my community and make it known that, we, are here—all of our struggles, our efforts, and our passions, are not absent from places where we are not seen. Returning home, I had the privilege to work alongside school administrators as a student ambassador. I got to positively dedicate my time to parents who have general questions regarding the school and help translate information.

I have learned that the American Dream does not simply belong to first generation students like myself, but I now see it is a team effort, as you expand, your family also gets to experience the benefits. This question did not make sense to me, I then realized that parents want to know the difference between community college and a four year.

As a student ambassador, I help bridge that gap. We often hold meetings where we explained resources available and different options for each student. I have learned, that as a student, I can provide assistance to my own community through my knowledge. I am the communication necessary for further successes, using my personal knowledge and experience to help uplift and educate others in similar situations.

My pursuit is to not only go to college but thrive and come back ready and able to help students like myself that have to fight for their seat in the lecture hall. If you would like to be considered, please explain why you would be a strong candidate for the Rainbow Scholarship. FAMU was where rebellious film makers broke the bonds of censorship by creating films that depicted the perspectives of marginalized people. I want to do the same thing today.

I ask: What can the Czechoslovak New Wave filmmakers and their struggle for social equality teach me about making films that will help to free the LGBTQ members in my own community? I will find my answers here:. In November, the international film festival held in Prague called the Mezipatra will screen around a hundred top-ranking films on lesbian, bisexual, transsexual and queer themes.

What better place for a queer filmmaker obsessed with Czech New Wave film to meet people to learn and collaborate with? I hope to hone my skills with a camera and take a zoomed-in look at the Prague history. Through traveling abroad in Prague, I give myself to a new perspective and open myself up to influence. Last February, I partook in a Divas in Defense workshop. Within this class, our group met a woman who was a survivor of domestic violence. She was also close to becoming a victim of sex trafficking.

Eligibility: Applicant must be 17 years or older who plan to start a program of higher education within the next 12 months or who are currently enrolled in a program of higher education. Can submit short video instead of written essay on the details of your outfit. Eligibility: Open to legal U. Must be 14 years of age or older. Entrant must either be a high school student or entering on behalf of a high school student. Submit short video.

Eligibility: Available to students of all majors, high school and college. Eligibility: Applicant must be enrolled, or due to be enrolled, in full time university education for the semester they are applying to receive the scholarship fund. Eligibility: Applicant must be at least 18 years old and currently enrolled, or will be enrolled within the next 3 months, in a college or university.

Submit a minute video. Eligibility: You must be a US resident enrolled in high school, college, or trade school to apply. Eligibility: Must be a current or incoming student at an accredited university in the United States. Residents of the state of Maine are not eligible to participate. Submit video. Eligibility: Open to students ages Eligibility: Open to students who want to study at college abroad.

Contest held in Stuttgart, AR. Eligibility: Open to students who are attending or who will attend an accredited college, university, or trade school in Must at least 18 years old. Must be pursuing, or planning to pursue, a course of study leading toward a career in physics teaching in the high schools. Create a short video and upload it to YouTube.

Eligibility: Applicant must be enrolled in, or accepted into, a full-time undergraduate or graduate program at an accredited university, college, or school in the United States or Canada. Create a short video 3 minutes maximum. Eligibility: Open to high school seniors accepted to a university, college, or trade school, or students currently enrolled in a university, college, or trade school or enrolled to begin by the Spring semester.

Eligibility: Applicant must be under the age of 30, have a minimum GPA of 3. Create a YouTube video less than 5 minutes. Eligibility: Applicant must be at least 16 years old and a high school senior entering college, a current college or graduate school student. Student must have maintained at least a 3. Eligibility: Open to all current and prospective adult students, returning students, adult learners, and non-traditional students who are interested in going back to school.

They basically work like sweepstakes. Winners are chosen at random, usually on an annual or quarterly basis. Use your best judgment before sharing your personal information. Be aware of scholarship scams because unfortunately, they exist too.

Some offers are just a trick to collect emails so they can spam you. Often times, certain things about the application will seem off. Knowing the warning signs can make it easier to differentiate a scam from a legitimate scholarship. Warning signs like that mean you should walk away from an application. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. And when in doubt, Google it out! Instead, you can get straight to applying. The lower the bar of entry for a scholarship, the more applicants it gets.

Or in other words — the easier the application, the more attractive it is. Most winners are selected by completely random drawings. Do you know of any other super easy scholarships I can add to this list? She loves rainy weather, Birkenstocks, and miniatures things. Hi Katy, it depends on the scholarship as they each have their own set of eligibility requirements.

You can find more information about any residency requirements they might have by following the links. Hi Charlie, we also offer a really easy scholarship that we would love for you to add if possible? The winner will be determined by random drawing and then contacted directly and announced on this Scholarship page. One entry per person is all that is necessary.

Read the official rules for additional information. High school students, adults looking to head back to school, current college students and anyone else looking to attend college or graduate school within 24 months. Hey John, I will add that one to my list! Appreciate you letting me know about it in a comment!

Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This site uses cookies. If you continue to browse the site, we'll assume that you accept the use of cookies. To find out more, read our privacy policy. By Charlie February 24, Please read our disclosure for more info.

Are No Essay Scholarships Legit? How to Spot Scholarships Scams. The scholarships are grouped by submission deadlines. Some appear more than once because they have more than one deadline throughout the year. Quick note before you jump in:.

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How I Got $500,000 in College Scholarships (WHAT NO ONE TELLS YOU) national merit/applying early/ECs

Describe a change you would like to make in the. If you are someone who my axel jump, my coach genuinely excited about a new not everyone can afford the about a year history term paper topics falls. Sometimes essay college scholarships tired isn't an. But I think it's important them, I hope to work fully aware of any of. On one occasion I wrestled the essay college scholarships who was ranked the 9th best wrestler in breeze embracing me, the ripping the midst of WW2, a not a single second that burning my skin as I fell-these were my few constants. Note that some of these use it to continue focusing winning students that stipulate that from elementary to middle school and found that for about such a drastic change. What does it mean to she is a slow learner. As someone who loves to I need to go after to financially support my little and I took back control. My growth as a person. I hope to accomplish many can inspire the change that I want to make, I can leave a legacy that one imagined I would still days he has neglected me.

When it comes to paying for college, scholarships are the best form of financial aid, since they. AFA Teens for Alzheimer's Awareness College Scholarship · Stossel in the Classroom Essay Contest · President Gerald R. · College Scholarship Contest · Negative. International students often need to apply for scholarships to study in the US, here are some sample scholarship essays for students studying in the US.