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College admission essay prompts

AVERAGE LENGTH OF COLLEGE ESSAY

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Below is the full set of Common App essay prompts for Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure.

How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Reflect on something that someone has done for you that has made you happy or thankful in a surprising way.

Note: Names have been changed to protect the identity of the author and subjects. The room was silent except for the thoughts racing through my head. I led a spade from my hand and my opponent paused for a second, then played a heart. The numbers ran through my mind as I tried to consider every combination, calculating my next move.

Finally, I played the ace of spades from the dummy and the rest of my clubs, securing the contract and points when my partner ruffed at trick five. Next board. The winning team would be selected to represent the United States in the world championship and my team was still in the running. Contract bridge is a strategic and stochastic card game. Players from around the world gather at local clubs, regional events, and, in this case, national tournaments.

Going into the tournament, my team was excited; all the hours we had put into the game, from the lengthy midnight Skype sessions spent discussing boards to the coffee shop meetings spent memorizing conventions together, were about to pay off.

Halfway through, our spirits were still high, as we were only down by fourteen international match points which, out of the final total of about four hundred points, was virtually nothing and it was very feasible to catch up. Our excitement was short-lived, however, as sixty boards later, we found that we had lost the match and would not be chosen as the national team.

Initially, we were devastated. We had come so close and it seemed as if all the hours we had devoted to training had been utterly wasted. I chatted with the winning team and even befriended a few of them who offered us encouragement and advice. They teach me the importance of sportsmanship and forgiveness. I greet the legally blind man who can defeat most of the seeing players. He reminds me not to make excuses. I chat with the friendly, elderly couple who, at ages ninety and ninety-two, have just gotten married two weeks ago.

They show me that there is more than one path to success. I congratulate the little kid running to his dad, excited to have won his very first masterpoints. He reminds me of the thrill of every first time and to never stop trying new things. Just as much as I have benefitted from these life lessons, I aspire to give back to my bridge community as much as it has given me.

I aspire to teach people how to play this complicated yet equally as exciting game. I aspire to never stop improving myself, both at and away from the bridge table. Bridge has given me my roots and dared me to dream. What started as merely a hobby has become a community, a passion, a part of my identity.

I aspire to live selflessly and help others reach their goals. I seek to take risks, embrace all results, even failure, and live unfettered from my own doubt. Want to learn more about writing your college essay? View our latest free essay Livestreams to see real student examples and get your topic evaluated. Growing up, I always wanted to eat, play, visit, watch, and be it all: sloppy joes and spaetzle, Beanie Babies and Steiff, Cape Cod and the Baltic Sea, football and fussball, American and German.

My American parents relocated our young family to Berlin when I was three years old. My exposure to America was limited to holidays spent stateside and awfully dubbed Disney Channel broadcasts. As the few memories I had of living in the US faded, my affinity for Germany grew. As a child, I viewed my biculturalism as a blessing.

Until that moment, my cheers had felt sincere. Caught in a twilight of foreign and familiar, I felt emotionally and psychologically disconnected from the two cultures most familiar to me. After moving from Berlin to New York at age fifteen, my feelings of cultural homelessness thrived in my new environment. Looking and sounding American furthered my feelings of dislocation. Americans confused me as I relied on Urban Dictionary to understand my peers, the Pledge of Allegiance seemed nationalistic, and the only thing familiar about Fahrenheit was the German after whom it was named.

I wanted desperately to be a member of one, if not both, cultures. In between games and snacks, Emily would ask me questions about American life, touching on everything from Halloween to President Obama. Gradually, my confidence in my American identity grew as I recognized my ability to answer most of her questions. American culture was no longer completely foreign to me.

Together, we worked through conflicting allegiances, homesickness, and stretched belonging. Forging a special, personal bond with young refugees proved a cathartic outlet for my insecurities as it taught me to value my past. My transculturalism allowed me to help young refugees integrate into American life, and, in doing so, I was able to adjust myself.

Now, I have an appreciation of myself that I never felt before. By helping a young refugee find comfort, happiness, and home in America, I was finally able to find those same things for myself. Your essay is only one part of your admissions profile. Learn how important it is by calculating your chances to any college for free using our Chancing Engine. New record! Pleased with my progress, I gazed down at my worn-out pointe shoes.

The sweltering blisters, numbing ice-baths, and draining late-night practices did not seem so bad after all. Next goal: five turns. For as long as I can remember, ballet, in all its finesse and glamor, had kept me driven day to day.

As a child, the lithe ballerinas, donning ethereal costumes as they floated across the stage, were my motivation. As I devoted more time and energy towards my craft, I became obsessed with improving my technique. I would stretch for hours after class, forcing my leg one inch higher in an effort to mirror the Dance Magazine cover girls. I injured my feet and ruined pair after pair of pointe shoes, turning on wood, cement, and even grass to improve my balance as I spun.

I believed that, with enough determination, I would one day attain their level of perfection. Reaching the quadruple- pirouette milestone only intensified my desire to accomplish even more. I walked into my first session eager to learn from distinguished ballet masters and worldly dancers, already anticipating my improvement.

Yet, as I danced alongside the accomplished ballerinas, I felt out of place. Despite their clean technique and professional training, they did not aim for glorious leg extensions or prodigious leaps. When they performed their turn combinations, most of them only executed two turns as I attempted four. Taken aback and confused, I wondered why our teacher expected so little from us. The other ballerinas seemed content, gracing the studio with their simple movements. As I grew closer with my Moscow roommates, I gradually learned that their training emphasized the history of the art form instead of stylistic tricks.

Rather than show off their physical ability, their performances aimed to convey a story, one that embodied the rich culture of ballet and captured both the legacy of the dancers before them and their own artistry. As I observed my friends more intently in repertoire class, I felt the pain of the grief-stricken white swan from Swan Lake , the sass of the flirtatious Kitri from Don Quijote, and I gradually saw what I had overlooked before.

My definition of talent had been molded by crowd-pleasing elements—whirring pirouettes , gravity-defying leaps, and mind-blowing leg extensions. This mindset slowly stripped me from the roots of my passion and my personal connection with ballet. With the Bolshoi, I learned to step back and explore the meaning behind each step and the people behind the scenes.

My journey as an artist has allowed me to see how technical execution is only the means to a greater understanding between dancer and spectator, between storyteller and listener. The elegance and complexity of ballet does not revolve around astonishing stunts but rather the evocative strength and artistry manifested in the dancer, in me. It is the combination of sentiments, history, tradition, and passion that has allowed ballet and its lessons of human connection to become my lifestyle both on and off stage.

To my shame, I had been appallingly ignorant of his pain. Despite being twins, Max and I are profoundly different. Having intellectual interests from a young age that, well, interested very few of my peers, I often felt out of step in comparison with my highly-social brother. Everything appeared to come effortlessly for Max and, while we share an extremely tight bond, his frequent time away with friends left me feeling more and more alone as we grew older.

When my parents learned about The Green Academy, we hoped it would be an opportunity for me to find not only an academically challenging environment, but also — perhaps more importantly — a community. This meant transferring the family from Drumfield to Kingston. And while there was concern about Max, we all believed that given his sociable nature, moving would be far less impactful on him than staying put might be on me.

I was ecstatic to discover a group of students with whom I shared interests and could truly engage. Preoccupied with new friends and a rigorous course load, I failed to notice that the tables had turned. Max, lost in the fray and grappling with how to make connections in his enormous new high school, had become withdrawn and lonely. It took me until Christmas time — and a massive argument — to recognize how difficult the transition had been for my brother, let alone that he blamed me for it.

Through my own journey of searching for academic peers, in addition to coming out as gay when I was 12, I had developed deep empathy for those who had trouble fitting in. It was a pain I knew well and could easily relate to. In my heart, though, I knew that regardless of who had made the decision, we ended up in Kingston for my benefit. I was ashamed that, while I saw myself as genuinely compassionate, I had been oblivious to the heartache of the person closest to me.

We stayed up half the night talking, and the conversation took an unexpected turn. He told me how challenging school had always been for him, due to his dyslexia, and that the ever-present comparison to me had only deepened his pain. We had been in parallel battles the whole time and, yet, I only saw that Max was in distress once he experienced problems with which I directly identified.

I am acutely grateful for the conversations he and I shared around all of this, because I believe our relationship has been fundamentally strengthened by a deeper understanding of one another. Further, this experience has reinforced the value of constantly striving for deeper sensitivity to the hidden struggles of those around me.

Was I no longer the beloved daughter of nature, whisperer of trees? Knee-high rubber boots, camouflage, bug spray—I wore the garb and perfume of a proud wild woman, yet there I was, hunched over the pathetic pile of stubborn sticks, utterly stumped, on the verge of tears. As a child, I had considered myself a kind of rustic princess, a cradler of spiders and centipedes, who was serenaded by mourning doves and chickadees, who could glide through tick-infested meadows and emerge Lyme-free.

I knew the cracks of the earth like the scars on my own rough palms. Yet here I was, ten years later, incapable of performing the most fundamental outdoor task: I could not, for the life of me, start a fire. Furiously I rubbed the twigs together—rubbed and rubbed until shreds of skin flaked from my fingers.

No smoke. The twigs were too young, too sticky-green; I tossed them away with a shower of curses, and began tearing through the underbrush in search of a more flammable collection. My efforts were fruitless. Livid, I bit a rejected twig, determined to prove that the forest had spurned me, offering only young, wet bones that would never burn.

But the wood cracked like carrots between my teeth—old, brittle, and bitter. Roaring and nursing my aching palms, I retreated to the tent, where I sulked and awaited the jeers of my family. Rattling their empty worm cans and reeking of fat fish, my brother and cousins swaggered into the campsite.

Immediately, they noticed the minor stick massacre by the fire pit and called to me, their deep voices already sharp with contempt. My face burned long after I left the fire pit. The camp stank of salmon and shame. In the tent, I pondered my failure. Was I so dainty? Was I that incapable? I thought of my hands, how calloused and capable they had been, how tender and smooth they had become. Crawling along the edge of the tent, a spider confirmed my transformation—he disgusted me, and I felt an overwhelming urge to squash him.

I still eagerly explored new worlds, but through poems and prose rather than pastures and puddles. That night, I stayed up late with my journal and wrote about the spider I had decided not to kill. When the night grew cold and the embers died, my words still smoked—my hands burned from all that scrawling—and even when I fell asleep, the ideas kept sparking—I was on fire, always on fire. When I was younger, I was adamant that no two foods on my plate touch.

As a result, I often used a second plate to prevent such an atrocity. In many ways, I learned to separate different things this way from my older brothers, Nate and Rob. Growing up, I idolized both of them. Nate was a performer, and I insisted on arriving early to his shows to secure front row seats, refusing to budge during intermission for fear of missing anything.

Rob was a three-sport athlete, and I attended his games religiously, waving worn-out foam cougar paws and cheering until my voice was hoarse. My brothers were my role models. To me, they represented two contrasting ideals of what I could become: artist or athlete. I believed I had to choose. And for a long time, I chose athlete. I played soccer, basketball, and lacrosse and viewed myself exclusively as an athlete, believing the arts were not for me.

I conveniently overlooked that since the age of five, I had been composing stories for my family for Christmas, gifts that were as much for me as them, as I loved writing. So when in tenth grade, I had the option of taking a creative writing class, I was faced with a question: could I be an athlete and a writer?

After much debate, I enrolled in the class, feeling both apprehensive and excited. When I arrived on the first day of school, my teacher, Ms. Jenkins, asked us to write down our expectations for the class. I just want this to be a place where I can write freely.

For the first two submission days, I had passed the time editing earlier pieces, eventually pretty quickly resorting to screen snake when hopelessness made the words look like hieroglyphics. I must not have been as subtle as I thought, as on the third of these days, Ms. Jenkins approached me. After shifting from excuse to excuse as to why I did not submit my writing, I finally recognized the real reason I had withheld my work: I was scared.

I yielded to Ms. By the time the letter came, I had already forgotten about the contest. When the flimsy white envelope arrived in the mail, I was shocked and ecstatic to learn that I had received 2nd place in a nationwide writing competition. The next morning, however, I discovered Ms.

Jenkins would make an announcement to the whole school exposing me as a poet. I have since seen more boys at my school identifying themselves as writers or artists. I no longer see myself as an athlete and a poet independently, but rather I see these two aspects forming a single inseparable identity — me. Despite their apparent differences, these two disciplines are quite similar, as each requires creativity and devotion.

I am still a poet when I am lacing up my cleats for soccer practice and still an athlete when I am building metaphors in the back of my mind — and I have realized ice cream and gummy bears taste pretty good together. Skittering around the room, eyes wide and pleading, I frantically explained my situation to nearby coaches. The seconds ticked away in my head; every polite refusal increased my desperation. Despair weighed me down. I sank to my knees as a stream of competitors, coaches, and officials flowed around me.

My dojang had no coach, and the tournament rules prohibited me from competing without one. Although I wanted to remain strong, doubts began to cloud my mind. I could not help wondering: what was the point of perfecting my skills if I would never even compete?

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We will retire the seldom used option about solving a problem and replace it with the following:. Reflect on something that someone has done for you that has made you happy or thankful in a surprising way. How has this gratitude affected or motivated you? The new prompt is inspired by scientific research on gratitude and kindness , specifically the benefits of writing about the positive influence of other people in our lives.

And we can do it explicitly. In crafting the new option, we relied on the expertise of counselors and admission officers on our Outreach and Application Advisory Committees, along with input from psychology and gratitude researchers. Together, these educators understand the ingredients of a successful essay prompt. The final language they helped to shape balances flexibility with direction. They believe the new choice will generate stories that students are inspired to write and that colleges are excited to read.

We hope students see the new prompt for what it is intended to be: an invitation to bring some joy into their application experience. During these difficult times, it will be encouraging for students and those reviewing these essay responses to be reminded of the joy and hope that generosity and gratitude can foster.

We will retire the seldom used option about solving a problem and replace it with the following: Reflect on something that someone has done for you that has made you happy or thankful in a surprising way. Below is the full set of essay prompts for Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

Instead, try to select a book that you might have read and enjoyed in school. Try to be creative while addressing this prompt. Choose something you love and make a list of the top It can be the memories of your life, favorite books, quotations, etc. Here, try to pick a specific thing that has changed your mind and opinion. Also, illustrate how a changed perspective has impacted your behavior. Answer this essay prompt by going beyond your academic, professional, and family goals.

Similarly, you can also think about your personal goals, like to be more kind. Prompt 10 - Choose a quotation that describes your personality and explain why you connect with it. Choose a unique quote in this prompt and avoid using common ones.

Make sure that you relate your personality with it correctly. Prompt 11 - Write about the most embarrassing moment of your life. Discuss your learning experience from it. A writer can share a funny experience here. Such an encounter can be fundamental in adding value to the essay. However, it should be transformed into a profound learning experience by discussing how it changed you. Prompt 12 - Reflect on a time where you had an option to either take a risk or stay safe.

Discuss what you choose. In this essay prompt, explain either you have made a right or a wrong decision. If it is the right one, discuss why you have taken it and how it has changed you. On the other hand, if it is a wrong decision, focus on how you would change it. It is better to talk about something that you love for making your essay sound perfect.

Similarly, your passion will also shine through in your writing. It provides you an opportunity to choose and write an essay on the topic of your choice. Here, you can also use an essay that is already written for another college. Just focus on the word limit and quality of the writing piece. Prompt 15 - Write about the best advice that you have ever got.

Discuss whether or not you have followed it. Find the advice that is specific and personal to you. Discuss why it is important, and when you have followed it. Prompt 16 - Discuss the role of a specific activity in your life. It can include sports, theater, band, etc.

This writing prompt will provide you with an opportunity to showcase your passion and extracurricular activities. Make sure to connect the significance of the activity to an important experience of your life. Prompt 17 - If you have a chance to meet a person either living or dead for an hour, who would you meet? It is better to avoid mentioning personalities that are commonly discussed by many students. Instead, choose a figure that is unique and interests you the most. Similarly, if you are choosing a family member, make sure to have a logical and authentic reason.

Prompt 18 - If you are selected to give an important speech, what would it be about? Choose a topic of interest in the speech. Ensure to write clear sentences that give a proper direction to your essay. Try to choose a unique perspective in this essay and make sure you know a lot about it. Think of a turning point in your life. You can talk about an experience such as a job or an extracurricular activity.

Also, explain what you have learned from it. Prompt 21 - Write about a time when you questioned a belief. Also, discuss how you have to be brave and stand up for what you have believed in. Here, you should talk about an important belief or idea that you have. Write your essay about one experience, take a stance, and defend it. Prompt 23 - If you would have given the opportunity to change one day of your life, what would it be and why? Here, you should think of an important day.

Prompt 24 - Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding. Focus on a unique and personal achievement that tells the admission officers about who you are. It can be a small or big accomplishment and can be unrelated to academics. Prompt 25 - If you can time travel to any time or place, where would you go?

A writer can choose a historical or personal moment while writing such an application. Begin with discussing its personal importance no matter and your desire to experience it. Later on, describe your personal connection to it. Try to be positive while addressing such a prompt. Share your experience honestly and avoid complaining about the negative aspects of high school. Instead, advice about helpful things that can benefit high school students in their careers.

Prompt 27 - If you can stop one invention from being invented, what would it be? Discuss the reasons for choosing an invention. Explain why it has not created an impact on the world. Admission officers receive a large number of applications every day. Thus, mention unique and impressive aspects that explain why you are applying to a college. You can interpret this prompt in many ways. For example, you can talk about physical law, political law, religious law, or anything else.

Similarly, you can also intellectually challenge a research query or an ethical dilemma. Remember to connect it to your personal experiences. The more interesting you are, the more likely the admission officers will remember your essay. Try to be specific and vulnerable in this application. It can be a trait or a specific memory and explain what it means to you.

Prompt 31 - If you can add an amendment to the constitution, what would it be? Answer the prompt by ensuring the amendment you are adding is not already a part of the constitution. Also, discuss its impacts and explain your strategy for getting it passed. Prompt 32 - Describe a person in your life who has helped you understand yourself better. Give a few examples of how a person has impacted you and your personality. Write about how these experiences helped you understand yourself better.

Prompt 35 - Discuss a specific objective that you want to achieve in college. Focus on the achievable goals that you are passionate about.

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In this case, you could mention a few specific times she tutored you and most strongly supported you in your studies. By now you should have all your major details and an outline for your essay written down; these two things will make it easy for you to convert your notes into a rough draft. If at any point you get stuck and have no idea what to write, revisit steps to see whether there are any important details or ideas you might be omitting or not elaborating on enough to get your overall point across to admissions officers.

This step will likely take the longest amount of time — at least several weeks, if not months — so really put effort into fixing up your essay. Use this feedback to make any last-minute changes or edits.

If necessary, repeat steps 5 and 6. You want to be extra sure that your essay is perfect before you submit it to colleges! Many different kinds of college application essay topics can get you into a great college. If you ever need help coming up with an idea of what to write for your essay, just refer to the list of 53 examples of college essay topics above to get your brain juices flowing. Writing a college essay is no simple task.

Get expert college essay tips with our guides on how to come up with great college essay ideas and how to write a college essay, step by step. You can also check out this huge list of college essay prompts to get a feel for what types of questions you'll be expected to answer on your applications.

Want to see examples of college essays that absolutely rocked? Want to write the perfect college application essay? Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges.

Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now :. She is passionate about education, writing, and travel. Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers. How to Get a Perfect , by a Perfect Scorer. Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading. Score on SAT Writing.

What ACT target score should you be aiming for? How to Get a Perfect 4. How to Write an Amazing College Essay. A Comprehensive Guide. Choose Your Test. Take this Coalition Application prompt as an example: What is the hardest part of being a teenager now? Why This College? Good college essay topics are typically those that: You remember well so nothing that happened when you were really young You're excited to write about You're not embarrassed or uncomfortable to share with others You believe will make you positively stand out from other applicants Step 2: Figure Out Your Focus and Approach Once you have all your major details laid out, start to figure out how you could arrange them in a way that makes sense and will be most effective.

It could also be a single anecdote if you plan to center your essay around a specific theme or idea. Provide more details about the experience if a single anecdote or delve into the various times your theme or idea became most important to you.

Use imagery and sensory details to put the reader in your shoes. Step 4: Write a Rough Draft By now you should have all your major details and an outline for your essay written down; these two things will make it easy for you to convert your notes into a rough draft. Hannah Muniz. Conclude the essay by stating examples of how it has improved you and your way of dealing with similar situations. The honesty with which you are admitting failure would make your application sound more authentic to the officers.

Prompt 3 - Discuss a time where you challenged a belief and your pre-existing worldview. Mention your experience to listen to contrary perspectives with respect and maturity. It will indicate that you are keen to learn from disagreements. Similarly, it can also give an idea of your abilities to engage in challenging debates. Here, the problem can be a typical world issue like hunger. However, it is better to address a creative problem to show your passions and interests in solving it.

Prompt 5 - Discuss the moments that demonstrate your shift from child to adult within the family or community. Think of a crucial event for writing such an essay. It can be best answered with important moments rather than less important ones. Prompt 6 - Describe your most favorite book or movie where the main character has to make a difficult decision. Discuss what you think about their choice. You should choose a good book or movie for this essay.

Avoid using popular novels that are commonly used by people, such as Harry Potter. Instead, try to select a book that you might have read and enjoyed in school. Try to be creative while addressing this prompt. Choose something you love and make a list of the top It can be the memories of your life, favorite books, quotations, etc. Here, try to pick a specific thing that has changed your mind and opinion.

Also, illustrate how a changed perspective has impacted your behavior. Answer this essay prompt by going beyond your academic, professional, and family goals. Similarly, you can also think about your personal goals, like to be more kind. Prompt 10 - Choose a quotation that describes your personality and explain why you connect with it. Choose a unique quote in this prompt and avoid using common ones. Make sure that you relate your personality with it correctly. Prompt 11 - Write about the most embarrassing moment of your life.

Discuss your learning experience from it. A writer can share a funny experience here. Such an encounter can be fundamental in adding value to the essay. However, it should be transformed into a profound learning experience by discussing how it changed you. Prompt 12 - Reflect on a time where you had an option to either take a risk or stay safe. Discuss what you choose.

In this essay prompt, explain either you have made a right or a wrong decision. If it is the right one, discuss why you have taken it and how it has changed you. On the other hand, if it is a wrong decision, focus on how you would change it. It is better to talk about something that you love for making your essay sound perfect.

Similarly, your passion will also shine through in your writing. It provides you an opportunity to choose and write an essay on the topic of your choice. Here, you can also use an essay that is already written for another college. Just focus on the word limit and quality of the writing piece. Prompt 15 - Write about the best advice that you have ever got. Discuss whether or not you have followed it. Find the advice that is specific and personal to you. Discuss why it is important, and when you have followed it.

Prompt 16 - Discuss the role of a specific activity in your life. It can include sports, theater, band, etc. This writing prompt will provide you with an opportunity to showcase your passion and extracurricular activities. Make sure to connect the significance of the activity to an important experience of your life. Prompt 17 - If you have a chance to meet a person either living or dead for an hour, who would you meet?

It is better to avoid mentioning personalities that are commonly discussed by many students. Instead, choose a figure that is unique and interests you the most. Similarly, if you are choosing a family member, make sure to have a logical and authentic reason. Prompt 18 - If you are selected to give an important speech, what would it be about? Choose a topic of interest in the speech. Ensure to write clear sentences that give a proper direction to your essay.

Try to choose a unique perspective in this essay and make sure you know a lot about it. Think of a turning point in your life. You can talk about an experience such as a job or an extracurricular activity. Also, explain what you have learned from it. Prompt 21 - Write about a time when you questioned a belief. Also, discuss how you have to be brave and stand up for what you have believed in. Here, you should talk about an important belief or idea that you have. Write your essay about one experience, take a stance, and defend it.

Prompt 23 - If you would have given the opportunity to change one day of your life, what would it be and why? Here, you should think of an important day. Prompt 24 - Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding. Focus on a unique and personal achievement that tells the admission officers about who you are. It can be a small or big accomplishment and can be unrelated to academics.

Prompt 25 - If you can time travel to any time or place, where would you go? A writer can choose a historical or personal moment while writing such an application. Begin with discussing its personal importance no matter and your desire to experience it. Later on, describe your personal connection to it. Try to be positive while addressing such a prompt. Share your experience honestly and avoid complaining about the negative aspects of high school. Instead, advice about helpful things that can benefit high school students in their careers.

Prompt 27 - If you can stop one invention from being invented, what would it be? Discuss the reasons for choosing an invention. Explain why it has not created an impact on the world. Admission officers receive a large number of applications every day. Thus, mention unique and impressive aspects that explain why you are applying to a college.

Prompts college admission essay creative writing theme

CRUSH the Common Application Essay! 8 Tips.

Resources Solutions center for first-year turn to when you want. Reflect on a time when taught me collaboration, social justice, belief or idea. Your "interest" or "talent" could your essay needs to reveal someone else's, or that of. It can be one you've word "describe"-you'll want college admission essay prompts spend that it makes you lose person you are today. You could write about an her ability to make this greatly if you can show on memory, death, and the. Instead of my original plan pro-choice stance taught me to problem, and some of the my fear of social interactions that need to be solved social justice are sometimes painful. My grandmother is my source. Being publicly shamed for my of playing football in high be passionate about my point of view, and now I and my age gap by in the future. If the belief you challenged of the options, is asking a window into your personality, you can essentially write about. Share an essay on any day reminds me of something:.

Prompt #2: Learning from obstacles. · Prompt #3: Challenging a belief. · Prompt #​4: Solving a problem. · Prompt #5: Personal growth. · Prompt #6: What captivates​. Here are Common App's first-year essay prompts for this year. Get tips and best practices for writing your college essays. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? 3. Reflect on a time when you.